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Sisymbrium orientale L.
Family: Brassicaceae
Indian hedgemustard,  more...
[Brassica kaber var. orientalis (L.) Scoggan]
Sisymbrium orientale image
Max Licher  
Annuals; glabrous or pubescent. Stems erect, branched distally, (1-)2-7(-8.5) dm, sparsely to densely (soft) pubescent at least basally, usually glabrous distally. Basal leaves rosulate; petiole (1-)2-5(-9) cm; blade broadly oblanceolate to oblong-oblanceolate (in outline), 3-8 (-10) cm × (10-)20-40(-60) mm, margins runcinate-pinnatipartite; lobes 2-5 on each side, oblong or lanceolate, much smaller than terminal lobe, margins subentire or dentate, (terminal lobe lanceolate, deltate, or often hastate). Cauline leaves similar to basal; (distalmost) blade with 1 or 2 lobes on each side, much smaller than terminal lobe, (terminal lobe narrowly lanceolate, linear, or hastate). Fruiting pedicels ascending to subdivaricate, stout, nearly as wide as fruit, 3-6 mm. Flowers: sepals ascending, oblong, 3.5-5.5 × 1-2 mm; petals spatulate, (6-)7-9(-10) × 2.5-4 mm, claw 3-5.5 mm; filaments (4-)5-8 mm; anthers oblong, 1-1.8 mm. Fruits narrowly linear, straight, smooth, stout, (5-)6-10 (-13) cm × 1-1.5 mm; valves glabrous or pubescent; ovules (60-)80-100(-140) per ovary; style (subclavate), 1-3(-4) mm; stigma prominently 2-lobed. Seeds 1-1.5 × 0.7-0.9 mm. 2n = 14. Flowering Mar-early Jun. Waste grounds, roadsides, disturbed sites; 0-1300 m; introduced; B.C.; Ariz., Calif., Mass., Nev., Oreg., Tex., Wash.; Europe; sw Asia; n Africa; introduced also in Central America, South America, Australia.
Jepson 1993
Duration: Annual Nativity: Non-Native Lifeform: Forb/Herb General: Annual with soft hairs of different sizes, highly branched stem to 30 cm tall. Leaves: Basal clustered, deeply pinnately lobed or compound, cauline leaves lanceolate, with 2 basal, lanceolate, spreading lobes, margins entire or few-toothed. Flowers: Raceme with petals 8-10 mm, pale yellow. Fruits: Silicle 3-10 cm long, linear, no beak, no hairs or sparse; ascending pedicel 3-6 mm long, style 1-3 mm, club shaped. Ecology: Found in disturbed areas from below 3,500 ft (1067 m); flowers May. Notes: Can be told apart from other two Sisymbrium by its generally more hairy nature, its clustered basal leaves, and pedicels thicker than siliques. Ethnobotany: Unknown, but other species in the genus have uses. Etymology: Sisymbrium is from a Greek name for some plants of the mustard family, while orientale means eastern. Synonyms: Brassica kaber var. orientalis Editor: SBuckley, 2010
Sisymbrium orientale image
Max Licher  
Sisymbrium orientale image
Max Licher  
Sisymbrium orientale image
Max Licher  
Sisymbrium orientale image
Max Licher  
Sisymbrium orientale image
Max Licher  
Sisymbrium orientale image
Julia Fonseca  
Sisymbrium orientale image
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